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About

Pex delivers independent video and music analytics & rights management services to enable creators, rights holders and marketers to find, measure and leverage the value of content across the Web. Pex was founded in 2014 in San Francisco. In 2016 the company relocated its HQ to sunny Downtown Los Angeles. ...

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Contact

Publicist
James Paasche
812-961-1903

Current News

  • 10/24/201910/24/2019

Pex Adds Apple Podcasts to its Content Identification Capabilities

Music is an integral part of podcasts, and as podcasting takes off as a format, knowing what music happens where will be increasingly important for rights holders. That’s why Pex has added podcasts to the dozens of online audio and video platforms and services it already scans for its clients.

As of today, Pex will be able to find musical works and audio snippets as short as a half second in all podcasts uploaded to Apple Podcasts. With an estimated 750,000 podcasts out there and an audience...

Press

  • Billboard, Mention, 11/12/2019, Music Tectonics on Fire: Tech Conference Carries On While Dodging LA Blazes Text
  • The Ringer, Mention, 10/16/2019, Play Loud and Carry a Big Stick Text
  • Billboard, Highlight, 08/23/2019, Executive Turntable: Moves at RCA, AXS, Columbia, Warner Records & More Text
  • PodNews, Feature story, 11/13/2019, Startup Pex can now scan Apple Podcasts for music clips Text
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News

10/24/2019, Pex Adds Apple Podcasts to its Content Identification Capabilities
10/24/201910/24/2019, Pex Adds Apple Podcasts to its Content Identification Capabilities
Announcement
10/24/2019
Pex
Announcement
10/24/2019
Pex is now able to find music and audio snippets as short as a half second in all podcasts uploaded to Apple Podcasts. With 750,000 podcasts out there and an audience of 62 million weekly podcast listeners in the US alone, podcasts are a vital piece of rights holders’ asset management puzzle, one Pex can help them track. MORE» More»
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Music is an integral part of podcasts, and as podcasting takes off as a format, knowing what music happens where will be increasingly important for rights holders. That’s why Pex has added podcasts to the dozens of online audio and video platforms and services it already scans for its clients.

As of today, Pex will be able to find musical works and audio snippets as short as a half second in all podcasts uploaded to Apple Podcasts. With an estimated 750,000 podcasts out there and an audience of 62 million weekly podcast listeners in the US alone, podcasts are a vital piece of music rights holders’ asset management puzzle, one Pex can help them track.

Pex uses its powerful fingerprinting technology to detect its clients’ audio files, tracking billions of pieces of content across the internet. It can find a match even when the copy is distorted or very short. It allows rights holders to see exactly how and where music is being used, and thus to address any uses that are not adequately licenced or fair use. 

 

Pex already finds and flags audio and video assets on several dozen social apps and video platforms, from TikTok to YouTube. “As audio formats gain popularity thanks to new devices and offerings, Pex wants rights holders to be able to monitor these formats and make good decisions for their business,” says Amadea Choplin, Pex’s COO. “Podcasts are increasingly professionalized, monetized, and ad driven, and music rights holders should be part of the conversation when their assets are being used.”

 

 

About Pex
Pex delivers independent video and music analytics and rights management services to enable creators, rights holders and marketers to find, measure and leverage the value of content across the Web. It can find snippets as short as 0.5 seconds across dozens of platforms worldwide. Clients include major music companies, video rights holders, and other key content producers and administrators. For more information, please visit pex.com/.

Announcement
10/24/2019

10/01/2019, Playing the Social Game: How Pro Sports Leagues Manage Content
10/01/201910/01/2019, Playing the Social Game: How Pro Sports Leagues Manage Content
Announcement
10/01/2019
Pex
Announcement
10/01/2019
Pex, the video analytics specialists who use fingerprinting to catch super-short snippets of video and audio across social media platforms, have taken a close look at the U.S. professional sports leagues’ content and how it travels and spreads--and what this says about the sport, its management, and the fans who love it. MORE» More»
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There’s a hotly contested competition on social media channels and video platforms between the established U.S. professional sports leagues. The NFL, MLB, and NBA are vying for sports fans’ attention, formulating unique game plans when it comes to social video, and trying every move from takedowns to local channel ownership to viral-ready highlights. 

 

Pex, the video analytics specialists who use fingerprinting to catch super-short snippets of video and audio across social media platforms, have taken a close look at the leagues’ content and how it travels and spreads--and what this says about the sport, its management, and the fans who love it. 

 

MLB content appears most prevalent on short-form platforms like Instagram and Twitter, likely because highlights are a favorite way to enjoy key moments in a game. MLB has shown more openness and flexibility when it comes to shares, taking down only 7.33% of league content. “MLB has given teams and individual players lots of leeway and opportunities to share video,” Wilson Hays of Pex notes. “With content owners encouraging user-generated uploads, it enables more opportunities for fan interaction and higher engagement as a result.” 

 

Takedowns don’t necessarily disable the spread of popular videos. The NFL leads in takedowns, slapping notices on 21.09% of videos featuring its content. The NBA ranks a fairly close second, with a 14.33% takedown rate. That said, short sports videos are everywhere; the footprint and reach that the NFL & NBA have drive 3x as many views and 8x as many derivative  videos (a view of any copy of an original video upload) in comparison to MLB based on the top content from each of the sports leagues so far in 2019. “Sharing videos is a currency of fan culture, and each sport league has a distinct perspective on this relationship with their audience,” reflects Hays. 

 

There’s also a generational factor suggested by where derivative video appears, the general demographic trends of each social platform. Facebook, where many older fans are active, is a popular re-upload destination for baseball and football fans, hosting 34.89% of MLB views from derivative videos and 40.57% of the NFL’s derivative video views. Most of the derivative video views for basketball happen on YouTube. “This is an important dynamic to keep in mind,” Hays says. “The volume of re-uploaded videos doesn’t always correlate with view counts. Content owners need to embrace audience trends for each platform and interact accordingly.” 

 

Sports-related videos prove popular across all big social and video platforms, without dominating any of them, unlike the love affair between music and YouTube, for example. Fans have yet to find their go-to platform to watch or share or reupload, making it an exploratory time for content owners to act strategically with each platform based on their audience’s intent. Hays concludes, “Focusing on your owned and operated content or a single platform only gives you a narrow perspective of the data narrative. To truly understand any video’s reach, you have to follow the sprawling threads of uploads across all platforms to make informed decisions about managing your social content and interacting appropriately with your audience.”

 

About Pex

Pex delivers independent video and music analytics and rights management services to enable creators, rights holders and marketers to find, measure, and leverage the value of content across the Web. It can find snippets as short as 0.5 seconds across dozens of platforms worldwide. Clients include major music companies, video rights holders, and other key content producers and administrators. For more information, please visit pex.com/.

 
Announcement
10/01/2019

04/01/2019, Pex Introduces its New, Free Attribution Engine to Connect Creators, Copyright, and Content Seamlessly
04/01/201904/01/2019, Pex Introduces its New, Free Attribution Engine to Connect Creators, Copyright, and Content Seamlessly
Announcement
04/01/2019
Pex
Announcement
04/01/2019
Today, Pex is launching its new Attribution Engine to connect original content with its creators and address the pervasive lack of transparency in digital rights attribution. MORE» More»

People are creating content that gets picked up by everyone from their followers and friends to the traditional media. Yet no one knows who the creator of the video clip they saw on their nightly news program is. Once videos, songs, and images are in the wild on the Internet, they take on a life of their own, almost completely detached from their original creators.

Today, Pex is launching its new Attribution Engine to connect this content with its creators and address the pervasive lack of transparency in digital rights attribution. Pex’s Attribution Engine allows any rights holder to declare ownership of their audio and video assets, and opens up the database of accurate, up-to-date ownership information to all media sharing platforms and content creators. Using snippets as short as half a second.

Attribution Engine is available unconditionally to any and all creators, rights holders, and platforms, completely free of charge.

How Attribution Engine works

Attribution Engine is a clearinghouse for digital copyrights. It pairs a complex database of media ownership information, with a custom look-up for any interested party. In its current form, the system supports any video or audio content.

All information stored in the database comes directly from the creators and rights holders. Anyone can create a free account. To prevent abuse, anonymous submissions are not allowed.
Each entry in the database is immutable. All content is fingerprinted by Pex’s proprietary algorithms and the results are stored in the database, available for future lookups. 

The database of registered assets is searchable by Attribution Engine users. Anyone, from individual content creators to large platforms, can become a user and look up copyrights using  an audio, video, or audiovisual file.

Underlying Technology

The fingerprinting and look-up capabilities of Attribution Engine stem from the established technology on which it is built. Pex’s algorithms, which have been powering Pex products for the past few years, allow for content identification with matching segments as short at 0.5 second in length, melody matching, and detecting compressed, cropped, or otherwise modified copies. 

The technology behind Attribution Engine grants substantial data storage and swift look-up for creators and platforms. The infrastructure already processes billions of messages daily, across thousands of servers. With response times within 5 seconds, high-volume users can scale with Attribution Engine. 

It’s free?!

Yes. Pex aims to broaden access to copyright information. By offering Attribution Engine at no cost to users, more rights holders can make their assets discoverable, and more platforms and creators can get obtain useful media ownership information. 

Pex is able to provide Attribution Engine free of charge because the business lies in the greater scope of its unique search technology. Asset registry and asset look-up services are only the start of the Attribution Engine’s capabilities. Revenue opportunities will come from transaction fees and emergent analytics solutions.

Announcement
04/01/2019

01/16/2019, The Pex Attribution Engine Allows Online Video and Music Platforms and Apps to Programmatically Authenticate Content Before Users Upload
01/16/201901/16/2019, The Pex Attribution Engine Allows Online Video and Music Platforms and Apps to Programmatically Authenticate Content Before Users Upload
Announcement
01/16/2019
Pex
Announcement
01/16/2019
As safe harbor and copyright are poised to cause significant turmoil for user-generated content platforms in some of the world’s biggest markets, Pex, the stealth global video and music search engine used by major labels, MCNs, music publishers, and movie studios, announces the February release of their Attribution Engine. MORE» More»

As safe harbor and copyright are poised to cause significant turmoil for user-generated content platforms in some of the world’s biggest markets, Pex, the stealth global video and music search engine used by major labels, MCNs, music publishers, and movie studios, announces the February release of their Attribution Engine, a multi-party solution ready to bring a radical improvement to how video is authenticated, a boon to platforms and rights holders alike.

Attribution--knowing who owns what, no matter how that content moves around the internet--will be the cornerstone of the next phase of digital content management, one dependent on stricter copyright, licensing, and royalty regimes. There is currently no efficient way to manage this information for video and audio across platforms. Pex’s technology stands apart in its ability to identify and attribute content without intensive human involvement. It promises to calm the frenzy and concern over regulations like the EU’s Article 13 and to support platforms and rights holders, big and small.

“Platforms will eventually have to identify content and respect the wishes of rights holders, regardless of what laws prevail,” says Pex CEO Rasty Turek. To do this, platforms and rights holders need an easy way to receive information about rights, to trust that content is being accurately attributed to the right people.

Pex aims to build this trust. Pex’s Attribution Engine is well suited to be an objective third party, giving both content providers and platforms accurate and transparent insights for licensing and equitable payouts. Though the company had been relatively quiet so far, Pex has earned the respect of the majors and hundreds of other rights entities through its rights management and analytics tools. For five years, its unique, proprietary fingerprinting and indexing technologies have helped creators to automatically identify uses of their music and videos across all major social platforms.

“We see just about every video and song posted online,” Turek explains. “We provide insights to rights holders about how often their content is used by others, where it has been used in small segments, and across which platforms it is carrying momentum. Our clients know we provide the data they need to strengthen their bargaining power without shutting down the people and companies that help distribute their content. It’s a win-win.” This data will prove equally helpful to platforms, as a new era of copyright dawns.

The Attribution Engine is opening up in phases. As early as February, rights holders will be able to register their content, be notified about ownership conflicts, and reconcile them through the platform. In addition, selected UGC platforms will be able to look up rights information for speedy and accurate identification.

Pex stands out versus other offerings in that it can identify both audio and video, and works with segments as short as one second to identify derivative works that otherwise create ownership and claims confusion. Most importantly perhaps, the solution will be available for free to both rights holders and selected platforms.

In phase two (Spring 2019), Pex will roll out a private repository version of the Attribution Engine, in which rights holders can create their own private library of assets and extract insights about their own content. “You can ask ‘How many of my songs are in this medley,’” explains Turek. “Or you can remove duplicates from your own library of content. You can run a new TV show through the library, for example, and find out what songs from your library are being used and automatically produce a precise cue sheet. Our deep search tools allow you to gain a wide variety of insights from your own content.”

“In addition to improving offerings for large rights holders, we seek to bring transparency and insights to all creators so they can get access to the information and remuneration they deserve. We’ve built this to level the field, something that’s been longed for by all parties,” concludes Turek. “Regardless of what happens with new legislation around the world, we are ready to help both streaming platforms and rights holders.”

Announcement
01/16/2019